Tourist gives Scrub bath to elephant in srilanka,elephant shows gratitude
September 25 2018, 2:12 PM
Two Tourists gives Coconut husk scrub bath to an asian elephant in the rivers of Maga Oya in Kegalle district in srilanka.

Have you ever give Scrub bath to elephant?

Two Tourists gives Coconut husk scrub bath to an asian elephant in the rivers of Maga Oya in Kegalle district in srilanka.The elephant enjoying the bath and moves around like he's getting tickled.After enjoying the bath the elephant shows gratitude to the tourists by splashing water on them.

Asian Elephants are one of the few remaining mega-herbivorous species in the world and they happen to be the most loved mammal in Sri Lanka. Despite the ongoing conflict between man and Elephant in the rural areas, everyone remains to be fascinated in observing their intelligent behaviour. The Sri Lankan Elephant population is about 2500 – 3000 and they hold great national value as a major tourist attraction. There are many places to see elephants around the country which have been declared as sanctuaries for these majestic animals as well as several other species. The large number of Elephants in a relatively small land brings a high chance of sightings. Visits to this area are always rewarding for wildlife enthusiasts and can be experienced in numerous Sri Lanka holiday packages!

Asian Elephants are one of the few remaining mega-herbivorous species in the world

Visits to this area are always rewarding for wildlife enthusiasts and can be experienced in Sri Lanka

They scrub bath to an asian elephant in the rivers.

The elephants are taken to the river twice a day for a bath.

All the babies less than three years of age are still bottle fed by the mahouts and volunteers.

The Pinnawala Elephant Orphanage is situated northwest of the town of Kegalle, halfway between the present capital Colombo and the ancient royal residence Kandy. It was established in 1975 by the Sri Lanka Wildlife Department in a 25 acre coconut property adjoining the Maha Oya River. The orphanage was originally founded in order to afford care and protection to the many orphaned Elephants found in the jungles of Sri Lanka. In 1978, the orphanage was taken over by the National Zoological Gardens from the Department of Wildlife. A captive breeding programme was launched in 1982. Since the inception of the programme over 20 elephants have been breaded here. The aim of the orphanage is to create a natural habitat for these elephants. However, there are some exceptions: the elephants are taken to the river twice a day for a bath, and all the babies less than three years of age are still bottle fed by the mahouts and volunteers.

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Source: Newsflare

Phuong Thao

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