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The son piggybacked his mother to the mountain to throw away, after knowing his mother sprinkled beans along the way, he burst into tear when knowing the reason
December 16 2018, 11:15 AM
On the way he thought: "Climb up, go far away, mother can not go home." When his mother sneakily sprinkle beans on the way, he was very angry asked: "Mom, what are you donging? "His mother said softly.

Boys can not support their old mother, decided to carry her mother to the mountain and thrown away. The son said that He wanted to lift his mother up the mountain for a while, she tried to climb up her back. On the way he thought: “Climb up, go far away, mother can not go home.” When his mother sneakily sprinkle beans on the way, he was very angry asked: “Mom sprinkle beans. “His mother quietly said:” Son, I’m afraid I’ll go alone will get lost. “Listen to that sentence, the son just kneeled down his mother and startedcrying …

Boys can not support their old mother, decided to carry her mother to the mountain and thrown away

For the mother, it was an assumed truth: When she got old, one of her kids would take her in. As far as her five children were concerned, however, it was never going to happen, though they didn’t say so to her face. Not that she was a bad mother (if anything she loved her offspring too intensely). But did they want a sweet, docile granny living in the spare bedroom? Far from it.

For the mother, it was an assumed truth: When she got old, one of her kids would take her in.

“She’s too difficult,” says her daughter, Barb, a retired schoolteacher in Windsor, Ont. “She argues about everything and I seriously could not take that. I would be a basket case.”

But when her mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, there was no question of Barb’s role. Despite every screaming match in her teenaged years, and every gritted-teeth conversation in adulthood, this was still her mother. Her siblings helped out but, ultimately, it was Barb, the eldest, who went to her mom’s house nearly every day, listened to her grouching, and patiently explained, for the hundredth time, why she couldn’t drive any more.

“There were days I absolutely hated going there,” she says of daily visits to her mother’s house. “It wasn’t something I wanted to do. But it was the right thing for my mother and for me.”

What do adult children owe their parents, and how far do those obligations extend?

Socrates and Plato pondered the question, philosophers have long debated it. A dusty law – left on the books in every province except Alberta, dating back to the Depression when social supports for the elderly were scant – says the state can enforce a financial duty on children to their poverty-stricken parents. (A proposed law in China would go even further, ordering children to regularly visit elderly parents.) Even if your parents don’t sue you, the question of obligation – moral, emotional and financial – is one more Canadians will encounter in a society with two converging complications: an aging and longer-living population, and families with fewer children, many of whom live too far away to share the load.

Source: Collect

Phuong Thao

 

 

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