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Old lady with foot binding since she was 5, calling it ‘lotus feet’ but it just brings her tragedy
December 12 2018, 2:29 PM
Real reason why Chinese women bound their feet ... and it wasn't for their pleasure

Foot binding was the custom of applying tight binding to the feet of young girls to modify the shape and size of their feet. It was practised in China from the Song dynasty until the early 20th century, and bound feet were considered a status symbol as well as a mark of beauty.

Only girls coming from rich family can do this since they don’t have to do any household work or hard labour ones.

Foot binding has to be done when the girl is as young as 3 or 4 years old. Before the produce, they have to drown their feet onto warm to hot water, in order to “soften the bones”.

The size of a foot binding is no larger than a palm of an adult.

Foot binding limited the mobility of women, and resulted in lifelong disabilities for most of its subjects, although some women with bound feet working outdoors have also been reported. Feet altered by binding were called lotus feet.

Foot binding limited the mobility of women, and resulted in lifelong disabilities for most of its subjects, although some women with bound feet working outdoors have also been reported.

The practice possibly originated among upper class court dancers during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period in 10th century China, then became popular among the elite during the Song dynasty, eventually spreading to all social classes by the Qing dynasty. Foot binding was practiced in different forms, and the more severe form of binding may have been developed in the 16th century.

The practice possibly originated among upper class court dancers during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period in 10th century China, then became popular among the elite during the Song dynasty, eventually spreading to all social classes by the Qing dynasty.

It has been estimated that by the 19th century, 40–50% of all Chinese women may have had bound feet, and up to almost 100% among upper class Chinese women. The prevalence and practice of foot binding however varied in different parts of the country.

The prevalence and practice of foot binding however varied in different parts of the country.

Only a few elderly Chinese women still survive today with bound feet.

There had been attempts to end the practice during the Qing dynasty; Manchu Kangxi Emperor tried to ban foot binding in 1664 but failed. In the later part of the 19th century, Chinese reformers challenged the practice but it was not until the early 20th century that foot binding began to die out as a result of anti-foot-binding campaigns. Only a few elderly Chinese women still survive today with bound feet.

Source: Blogtamsu

Thaopham

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