Five girls severely burned after playing with a household fruit every family has
December 07 2018, 3:04 PM
Five young girls from Fresno, Calif., had to nurse second-degree burns caused by a dangerous mix of two summertime staples: sun and a fruit.

On a beautiful day, five girls named Jewels, Jazmyn, Bailey, Candy and Reyghan aged 7 to 11 from Handford, California played together in the backyard swimming pool. The next day, the five daughters had blistering burns over huge swaths of skin.

The doctor said that all 5 suffered second-degree burns. 

The girls' parents rushed them to the hospital because the burns were so painful. The doctor said that all 5 suffered second-degree burns. All of them were kept in the intensive care room and stayed in the hospital for two weeks for treatment, and they were not allowed to expose to the sun for at least six months.

Jewels, Jazmyn, Bailey, Candy and Reyghan

The question which many people asked is why the children had such severe burns. Initially, doctors suspected the chemical from sun cream caused their burns. However, their family claimed that this was not possible because they had never been allergic to the creams they used.

Doctors suspected the chemical from sun cream caused their burns.(Symbolic image)

The truth of the incident was revealed when a girl shared that all 5 picked limes of neighbor up, squeezed the juice and poured the lemon juice into each other. At this time, the doctors understood the problem and concluded that all five girls were diagnosed with phytophotodermatitis, a form of skin irritation brought on by a reaction between photosynthesizing chemicals found in citrus fruits and ultraviolet light from the sun.

All 5 picked limes of neighbor up, squeezed the juice and poured the lemon juice into each other.(Symbolic image)

"UV light changes the structure of the chemicals and causes a toxic reaction on the skin,"   a dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Dr. MinnDawn Davis said.

The severity of the reaction depends on the duration and intensity of sunlight exposure, according to Davis and the amount of chemical on the skin. And while the pain and inflammation typically subside in a matter of days, phytophotodermatitis can cause skin pigment changes that linger for weeks or months.

The doctors concluded that all five girls were diagnosed with phytophotodermatitis. (symbolic image)

After knowing the reasons, the girls regretted "We never thought lime can burn our skin like acid,", Jewels said.

But ABC News' chief health and medical editor Dr. Richard Besser said the condition is more common than people realize. Bartenders are particularly prone to phytophotodermatitis

He added "It can be anywhere from a mild rash where you see darkening of the skin to something quite severe like big blisters like these girls had,". He also warned everyone:  "The only advice around this is if you've been handling limes, wash your hands before you go out in the sun."

Source: ABCNews

Vu Tam

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