Home / Omg
Awesome footage of a sand painting named “Monkey King Goes Back Home"
October 07 2018, 8:26 AM
Awesome footage has emerged from China of a sand painting named “Monkey King Goes Back Home" which was created to celebrate Chinese New Year.

The video, captured in Harbin, Heilongjiang Province on Tuesday, shows the whole process of sand painting, amazing audiences.

Sandpainting is the art of pouring colored sands, and powdered pigments from minerals or crystals, or pigments from other natural or synthetic sources onto a surface to make a fixed, or unfixed sand painting. Unfixed sand paintings have a long established cultural history in numerous social groupings around the globe, and are often temporary, ritual paintings prepared for religious or healing ceremonies. It is also referred to as drypainting.

Sun Wukong, also known as the Monkey King, is a figure who features in legends. He appears as the main character in the 16th-century Chinese classical novel Journey to the West (西游记).

 

Sun Wukong is also found in many later stories and adaptations. In the novel, he is a monkey born from a stone who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices. After rebelling against heaven and being imprisoned under a mountain by the Buddha, he later accompanies the monk Tang Sanzang on a journey to retrieve Buddhist sutras from "the West".

Sun Wukong possesses immense strength; he is able to lift his 13,500 jīn (7,960 kilograms (17,550 lb)) staff with ease. He is also extremely fast, able to travel 108,000 li (21,675 kilometres (13,468 mi)) in one somersault. Sun knows 72 transformations, which allow him to transform into various animals and objects; however, he has trouble transforming into other forms, due to the accompanying incomplete transformation of his tail.

Sun Wukong is a skilled fighter, capable of defeating the best warriors of heaven. Each of his hairs possesses magical properties, capable of being transformed into clones of the Monkey King himself, and/or into various weapons, animals, and other objects. He knows spells to command wind, part water, conjure protective circles against demons, and freeze humans, demons, and gods alike.

One of the most enduring Chinese literary characters, Sun Wukong has a varied background and colorful cultural history. Sun Wukong's origin is from the White Monkey legends from the Chinese Chu kingdom (700–223 BC), which revered gibbons and especially white-colored ones. These legends gave rise to stories and art motifs during the Han dynasty, eventually contributing to the rise of the Sun Wukong figure.

Sun Wukong was initially developed as a Taoist immortal/Deity before being incorporated into Buddhist legends. He is also considered by some scholars to be influenced by elements of both Chinese folk tales and the Hindu deity Hanuman from the Ramayana.

(Cre: Newsflare)

Nguyen Mai Huong

Got a story for us? Need to tell us about something amazing you’ve seen or done? Want us to investigate something? Get in touch!

Email feedytv.news@gmail.com, and you could even earn money for your stories or tips.